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Bushwalking track notes, photographs, maps and more for Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley are found in each of the tabs below
Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley
Time: 2 Days Walking time
Please allow extra time to rest and to explore
3.2 km S of Katoomba
Length: 29.2 km Walk Length
As this is a One Way walk, the 29.2 km only includes the walking distance from the start to the end point
Blue Mountains National Park
Climb: 2135 m Total Climbing
This walk has a total cumulative climb of 2135 m, this is the total of the elevation gains made in each of the walks uphill sections
There is car access and parking near the start and end of this walk There is a bus stop within 2km of the start of this walk There is a train station near the end of this walk
Style: One way
Route: Hard

This is the two day version of this popular and challenging walk. This walk passes popular sights including the Landslide, Ruined Castle, Mt Solitary and Wentworth Falls, and is a great way to explore the Jamison Valley. Water is rarely available at the campsite, with the Kedumba River being the only source of reliable water in the middle of this walk. (open in app)

This walk passes through a remote area and sections have no visible track. At least one person in your group should have training and experience in off track walking and navigation. Even with these notes and a GPS these extra skills and equipment are required.
There are Closed areas in Blue Mountains National Park
Today's Fire rating
LOW MODERATE (No fire ban)
  Bushwalking track notes photographs, maps and camping spots for Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley

Map of Walk

Location

                Sponsor of Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley bushwalking tracknotes
Map of Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley
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Map Controls - Show Contours | Hide Path | Hide Distances | Hide Names
Map Scale 5 km
Scenic World
Scenic Railway (Bottom Platform)
Int of Scenic Railway Boardwalk and Landslide Bush Track
Landslide
Bottom of Golden Staircase
Miners Campsite
Northern Ruined Castle campsite
Ruined Castle mine campsite
Northern Ruined Castle campsite
Ruined Castle
Intersection South of Ruined Castle
Bottom of Korrowall Knife-edge
Top of Korrowall Knife-edge
Corowal Plateau campsite
Chinamans Gully campsite
Chinamans Gully campsite
Singa-Jingawell Creek Campsite
Solitary Pass
Int of Kedumba Camping and Solitary Tracks
Kedumba River
Int of Kedumba River track and Sublime Point trail
Int of Sublime Point and Waterboard Servicetrails
End of Kedumba River Rd
End of Hordern Rd
King's Tableland Intersection
Int of Kings Tableland and Rocket Point Tracks
Rocket Point Circuit Intersection
Rocket Point Creek Intersection
Top of Wentworth Falls
Int of Weeping Rock and Wentworth Falls Tracks
Weeping Rock waterfall
Int of Charles Darwin and Weeping Rock Tracks
Int of Charles Darwin and Fletcher St Tracks
Int of Charles Darwin and Parkes St Tracks
Int of Charles Darwin Track and Wentworth Falls Fire Station Trail
Int of Charles Darwin Track and Page Ave Tracks
Wilson Park
Starting point for this hiking track: Scenic Railway (Bottom Platform)

Base maps are used under licence and is © Department of lands   Panorama Avenue Bathurst 2795   www.lands.nsw.gov.au

Maps that cover the walk area (please always carry maps of the area)

Print a map and track notes here
 Six Foot Track 1:50 000 Map Series NSW-six-foot-track 
 Jamison 1:25 000 Map Series NSW-89302N 
 Katoomba 1:25 000 Map Series NSW-89301S 
 Katoomba 1:100 000 Map Series 8930 

Photo Gallery

 
Bottom Platform of the Scenic Railway
 
Bottom Platform of the Scenic Railway +
 
Looking up at Malaita Point
 
Looking up at Malaita Point +
 
IMG_0559
 
IMG_0559 +

 
The view from the bottom of the Golden Staircase
 
The view from the bottom of the Golden Staircase +
 
Going up to the Ruined Castle
 
Going up to the Ruined Castle +
 
The valley from the top of Mt Solitary
 
The valley from the top of Mt Solitary +

 
The clearing back from the Mt Solitary Lookout
 
The clearing back from the Mt Solitary Lookout +
 
Going along the cliffs of Mt Solitary
 
Going along the cliffs of Mt Solitary +
 
The view from the top of the cliffs of Mt Solitary
 
The view from the top of the cliffs of Mt Solitary +

 
The Kedumba River
 
The Kedumba River +
 
The Waterboard Servicetrail going up through the cliffs
 
The Waterboard Servicetrail going up through the cliffs +
 
The end of Hordern Rd
 
The end of Hordern Rd +

 
Wentworth Falls from Rocket Point
 
Wentworth Falls from Rocket Point +
 
As the water cascades down the rocks it is very beautiful
 
As the water cascades down the rocks it is very beautiful +
 
Crossing Jamison Creek
 
Crossing Jamison Creek +

Terrain

Cross sectional view of the Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley bushwalking track

Cross Section of the Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley bushwalking track



Analysis and summary of the altitude variation on the Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley bushwalking track

Summary of the gradients over the the lenght of the Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley bushwalking track

Overview of this walks Grading - Based on the AS 2156.1 - 2001
These details are new. This new feature still requires more testing and refining. Please use the 'Walker Feedback' for report specific issues. Please e-mail Matt if you have any general comments. Hope you find it helpful.

Under this standard, a walk is graded based on the most difficult section of the walk.
Length 29km
Time 2 Days
.


Grade 5/6

Route: Hard
AS 2156.1 Gradient Very steep and difficult scrambles (5/6)
Quality of track Rough unclear track (5/6)
Signs No directional signs (5/6)
Experience Required High level of bushwalking experience recommended (5/6)
Weather Forecast, unforecast storms and severe weather likely to have an impact on your navigation and safety (5/6)
Infrastructure No facilities provided (5/6)
*This summary of grading information is new and still in testing

Some more detail of this walks Grading
Here is a bit more details explaining the grading looking at sections of the walk.
Gradient
8km of this walk is very steep and another 7km has short steep hills. Whilst another 6km has gentle hills with occasional steps and a 5km section is flat with no steps. The remaining 3km is very steep with difficult rock scrambles.

Quality of track
7km of this walk follows a rough track, where fallen trees and other obstacles are likely and another 7km follows a smooth and hardened path. Whilst another 6km follows a formed track, with some branches and other obstacles and a 6km section follows a clear and well formed track or trail. The remaining 3.4km follows a rough unclear track.

Signs
12km of this walk is clearly signposted and another 7km has directional signs at most intersection. Whilst another 7km has minimal directional signs and the remaining 3.6km Has no directional signs.

Experience Required
11km of this walk requires no previous bushwalking experience and another 7km requires some bushwalking experience. Whilst another 7km requires a leader a with moderate level of bushwalking experience and the remaining 4.8km requires a leader with a high level of bushwalking experience.

Weather
18km of this walk is not usually affected by severe weather events (that would unexpectedly impact safety and navigation) and another 7km is affected by forecast, unforecast storms and severe weather events that may impact on navigation and safety. Whilst another 4.9km is affected by storms that may impact your navigation and safety and the remaining 450m forecast, unforecast storms and severe weather likely to have an impact on your navigation and safety.

Infrastructure
12km of this walk is close to useful facilities (such as fenced cliffs and seats) and another 6km has limited facilities (such as not all cliffs fenced). Whilst another 6km has limited facilities (such as cliffs not fenced, significant creeks not bridged) and the remaining 4.8km has no facilities provided.

Track Notes


Catch the bus to Scenic World
Public transport (bus) available to this Bushwalk You can phone 131500 (the transport info line) for up to date running times.
Use these links to plan your Bus (and train) trip to the end of this walk.
(Links currently not working sorry)
Plan your trip from --> Castle Hill|Chatswood|Dural|Epping|Gosford|Hornsby|Katoomba|Manly|Parramatta|Penrith|Strathfield|Sutherland|Sydney|
Drive to Scenic World
You can drive or ride to this start of this Bushwalk There is free parking available.
You can drive or ride to the start of this walk
Use these links to plan your trip to the start of this walk.
Plan your trip from --> Castle Hill|Chatswood|Dural|Epping|Gosford|Hornsby|Katoomba|Manly|Parramatta|Penrith|Strathfield|Sutherland|Sydney|

Free Beacon Hire Alt = 0 m
A Personal Locating Beacon (PLB) is a hand-held device that, when triggered, sends a message to the emergency services with your location. The emergency services staff can then look at your trip intention forms and decide how best to help you. In the Blue Mountains, you can borrow these for no charge, just complete this Trip intention form, and a borrowing form. The device can be picked up from:
NPWS Office - Govetts Leap Rd Blackheath - 9am to 4pm 7 days Ph: 02 4787 8877
Katoomba Police Station - 217 Katoomba St Katoomba - Anytime Ph: 02 4782 8199
Springwood Police Station - 4 Jerseywold Avenue Springwood - Anytime Ph: 02 4751 0299
More info

Scenic World Alt = 951 m
Scenic World is one of the most renowned tourist attractions of Katoomba and the Blue Mountains. Located on the cliffs of the Jamison Valley [1], visitors can enjoy a ride on the Scenic Railway (the world's steepest incline railway) or the Scenic Cableway, into the Jamison Valley, and explore the Scenic Walkway from the base. Alternatively, the Scenic Skyway offers a bird's eye view over the valley, with a glass floor to enhance the experience. Scenic World also features a revolving restaurant, a cafe and a kiosk, in addition to the documentary theatre and souvenir shop. Rides can be purchased, starting from $16 for adults and $10 for children, and combination or family passes are available. More info

(0 km) Scenic World to Landslide
Track: Moderate - transport,duckboard,bushtrack
Length = 1.64 km Time = 1 hr 12 mins
Climb = 183 m Descent = -388 m
From Scenic World, this walk goes down the cliffs using the Scenic Railway. Hang on tight! This 415m-long journey is the world's steepest railway. At the bottom, the track comes to a great viewing platform of the valley. Use of the railway costs $10 for adults and $5 for children one-way. Last train normally at 4:45pm (opens at 9am)
Turn left : From the bridge over the bottom of the Scenic Railway, this walk follows the signs to 'scenic walkway', passing a replica of a mining cart, as well as an old mine. Just past this, the walk comes to a pipeline that runs down the hill collecting fresh water, signposted as drinkable. Continuing past the old mine shafts along the boardwalk, this walk comes to an intersection with a bush track going slightly off to the right. This is signposted as the way to the Landslide.
Continue straight: From the intersection, the walk follows the wide track and signposts towards the 'landslide'[2] (keeping the cliffs on the right). The walk winds along a bush track with small boulders strewn along it. There are a number of old mine shafts just off the track and some interesting historical items. The track continues under Malaita Point before breaking out of the vegetation to a worthy view of the valley, just before the landslide. As the track comes to the old landslide site, it become rougher with plenty of boulders over the track. There are also excellent views of the cliffs above and the landslide as the vegetation is quite sparse here. More info

The Landslide Alt = 742 m
'The Landslide' is a large rockfall going into the valley approximately 100m. There is a good vantage point for the landslide from under the cliffs to the east, and a great but more distant view from Narrow Neck lookout. The landslide occurred in 1931 after a few days of rumbling. There has been much debate as to whether this event was helped along by erosion and coal mining in the area at the time.

(1.64 km) Landslide to Bottom of Golden Staircase
Track: Moderate - bushtrack
Length = 1.55 km Time = 42 mins
Climb = 128 m Descent = -123 m
Continue straight: From the eastern side of the Landslide, the walk heads across the face of the landslide (keeping the cliff on the right). At this point, the track is quite rough, with frequent boulders making it a slight scramble. On the other side of the landslide, the track narrows and becomes a flat bush track that follows the base of the cliffs. The surrounding trees become quite dense again, adding quite an ambiance to the area. The walk heads along the bottom of the Narrow Neck escarpment, until coming to an intersection with a set of stairs off to the right, signposted as the 'Golden Staircase'.

(3.19 km) Bottom of Golden Staircase to Miners Campsite
Track: Moderate - bushtrack
Length = 2.26 km Time = 51 mins
Climb = 104 m Descent = -129 m
Continue straight: From the intersection, this walk follows the 'Federal Pass - Ruined Castle' sign[3] along the flat wide track, keeping the valley to your left. This track follows the old horse-drawn coal tram route. The track leads through a tall rainforest filled with fern trees[4] and vines[5], with the occasional lyrebird. After about 1.3km the forest opens up[6], letting in more light and exposing some distant filtered views. After wandering through the more open forest[7] for about 250m, the track passes a small campsite[8] (on the right). This walk continues for another 700m along the main track through the bracken fern forest[9] to find a larger campsite[10] (just up to the right) with a short stone wall on one side[11]).

Miners Campsite Alt = 726 m
This flat campsite beside the Federal Pass walking track about 2.2km south of the intersection at the bottom of the Golden Stairs. There is short constructed stone wall[12] left over from when there area was habited by miners. The campsite is surrounded by a tall forest, bracken ferns and some nice fern trees. There is no water or facilities.

(5.45 km) Miners Campsite to Northern Ruined Castle campsite
Track: Moderate - bushtrack
Length = 300 m Time = 7 mins
Climb = 16 m Descent = -11 m
Continue straight: From the miners campsite[13], this walk follows the clear track south-west, keeping the valley to your left. The mostly flat track narrows a bit as it leads past a large flat area (on your right) after about 140m[14], then past a smaller campsite[15] a short distance later. The track then winds through the forest for another 100m to come to a clearing and signposted three-way intersection[16], where there is a 'Federal Pass - Katoomba' sign[17] pointing back along the track. (There is a campsite a few metres further on and to the the left[18].)

Northern Ruined Castle campsite Alt = 726 m
A short distance south east of the intersection[19] with the Federal Pass and the northern access track to the Ruined Castle, is a fairly large basic campsite. There are two main flat areas for camping, both with fire scares[20]. The area is surround with tall trees and ferns[21][22][23][24]. There is no water nor any other facilities.

(5.75 km) Northern Ruined Castle campsite to Intersection South of Ruined Castle
Alternate Route: Track: Moderate - bushtrack ( Show detail)
Length = 933 m Time = 23 mins
Climb = 22 m Descent = -77 m
Continue straight: From the intersection, this walk follows the 'Mount Solitary' sign[25] past the campsite (on your left) and past the 'Warning - Remote area indistinct route steep terrain - Exposed climbing loose surfaces - No reliable water Carry plenty Sterilise any water found on route' sign[26]. This walk continues along the mostly flat track, passing through a tall turpentine forest[27] for about 450m where you come into view of a campsite[28] (down to your left). The walk continues a short distance further, coming to an intersection[29] where there is a fair amount of coal on the ground[30], a campsite down to your left[31] and the entrance to an old small coal mine[32] (behind a rock) on your right.
Continue straight: From the intersection, this walk follow the main track south-east, initially keeping the campsite and valley to your left. The track initially heads down a short rocky section[33] then flattens out to pass a large square boulder[34] after about 100m. The track continues through ferny forest for just over 200m, then passes another campsite[35] (down a steep hill to your left), and about 30m further on, comes to a signposted intersection where a 'Katoomba' arrow[36][37] points back along the track.
Continue straight to rejoin the main walk, following the notes from 6.87km 'Intersection South of Ruined Castle'.

(5.75 km) Northern Ruined Castle campsite to Ruined Castle
Track: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 727 m Time = 20 mins
Climb = 82 m Descent = -17 m
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk follows the 'Ruined Castle'[38] sign uphill along the eroded track and soon passes the yellow 'Warning - Remote area indistinct route steep terrain - Exposed climbing loose surfaces - No reliable water Carry plenty Sterilise any water found on route' sign[39]. The track winds up the wide valley getting steeper as it goes, climbing up onto the main ridgeline. Here the walk turns left (away from the view of Castle Head[40]) and follows the rocky track more gently uphill for about 220m to pass under the side of a large boulder[41]. The track continues along the narrow ridge for about 280m, with some filtered views past another large boulder to the base of the tall Ruined Castle summit[42]. Here the walk heads gently down a bit (keeping the rock wall to your left), past a crevice[43], then follows the main track to the other (southern) side of the summit. The track then heads up again to find a number of rocky pinnacles[44].

The Ruined Castle Alt = 793 m
A formation jutting out of the Jamison Valley, the Ruined Castle has great views of the Jamison Valley from Katoomba to Leura. It is also possible to see Mt Solitary to the south-east.

(6.48 km) Ruined Castle to Intersection South of Ruined Castle
Route: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 389 m Time = 12 mins
Climb = 1 m Descent = -123 m
Continue straight: From near the summit of Ruined Castle[45], this walk heads south-east along the main ridgeline, initially keeping the rock wall to your left[46]. The track follows the rocky ridgeline gently downhill[47] and after about 70m the track starts to become much steeper[48]. The track winds down, flattening out for a short time[49] before continuing steeply down to a sign posted three-way intersection[50] just beyond the 'Ruined Castle to Mount Solitary' map[51]. There is a 'Ruined Castle' arrow[52] here, pointing back up the hill.

(6.87 km) Intersection South of Ruined Castle to Bottom of Korrowall Knife-edge
Track: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 1.33 km Time = 35 mins
Climb = 132 m Descent = -38 m
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk follows the 'Mount Solitary' sign[53] gently downhill along the fairly narrow track[54], keeping the main valley to your left. After about 300m, the more eroded and rocky track[55] begins to climb the ridge and after climbing for just shy of 300m, the track flattens out and passes a couple of small clearings[56][57] - the second clearing is just past where the track leads downhill. Just after the second clearing (used as a campsite[58]), the track begins to climb up the ridge again[59]. This track climbs up a few rocky eroded section and soon comes to the base of a tall series of rockwalls - the Korrowall Knife-edge[60].

(8.2 km) Bottom of Korrowall Knife-edge to Top of Korrowall Knife-edge
Route: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 204 m Time = 12 mins
Climb = 86 m Descent = -2 m
Continue straight: From the base of the rocks[61], this walk starts the arduous climb up the Korrowall Knife-edge. Ascending the Korrowall Knife-edge is a hard climb, vertical in places and much of the climbing will involve both hands - some people use ropes to help lift heavy packs. This walk initially heads around to the left of the first boulder to head up through the eroded steep valley[62] between the rocks. The walk continues to scramble up the side of the rocks[63], then climbs vertically up a crack in the rock[64] to a small flat area[65], offering the first distant view[66] for this climb. The walk continues by climbing up a 3m rock wall[67], then up the eroded track[68] before climbing up through the obvious gap[69] in the next rock wall. At the top of this climb is another great view[70] and a short distance further up, this faint track passes a rock with a hole/cave[71] (on your right). From here, the walk follows the worn track up through a couple more rock gullies[72], still generally keeping the rock wall to your right (and passing a couple of arrows[73]). This brings the walk to an exposed flat area, with red dirt and fantastic views[74]. The walk continues by climbing up through the next eroded gully[75] to the top of the Korrowall Knife-edge, where there is a large rock wall on your left[76].

Mt Solitary Lookout Alt = 944 m
This informal lookout is on top of the 'Koorowall Knife Edge' on the western side of Mount Solitary. The lookout boasts some fantastic views over the Jamison Valley and to the west - this is well-worth the scramble to the top. There is some natural shelter and shade to rest amongst, and some people have camped here in the past (although better camping is available in Chinamans Gully).

(8.4 km) Top of Korrowall Knife-edge to Corowal Plateau campsite
Route: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 449 m Time = 19 mins
Climb = 119 m Descent = -15 m
Continue straight: From the top of Korrowall Knife-edge, this walk heads south following a worn track that initially heads steeply down beside the large rock wall[77] (keeping the wall to your left). The track passes a small cave[78] at the base of this cliff then climbs up beside the cliff[79] to the top of the ridge[80], past the rocks[81] to find a view to the left[82]. Here the faint track veers right[83] to follow along the base of another cliff[84]. The walk then heads up a short but steep climb[85], where a short flat walk[86] leads to a fantastic view on your right, looking over Cedar Creek valley to Narrow Neck[87]. After following this faint track a further 60m south along the base of another cliff[88], this walk then climbs up the middle of a steep gully [89] - just past the top of this climb, the track bends sharp left and leads up[90] the hill for about 50m to enter a lovely she oak forest[91], a clearing[92] and the Corowal Plateau campsite[93].

Corowal Plateau campsite Alt = 953 m
The Corowal Plateau campsite is an informal campsite at the north eastern end of Mount Solitary. The clearing is set among some pleasant casurina forest. There are a few campfire scares, although this is in a fuel stove only area. There is plenty of flat area but there is no water source or any other facilities.

(8.85 km) Corowal Plateau campsite to Chinamans Gully Campsite
Track: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 818 m Time = 19 mins
Climb = 8 m Descent = -120 m
Veer right: From the campsite[94], this walk heads south-east, following the mostly flat track along the top of the ridge through the she oak forest[95]. After about 200m, this walk enters a banksia forest[96], and continues along the flat ridge (past a few impromptu campsites) for about 400m, where the track begins to head downhill[97]. The track winds downhill for about 170m (passing a track on your left) and comes to a large flat saddle[98] and clearing with a large rock wall, Chinamans Gully Campsite[99].

Chinamans Gully Campsite Alt = 841 m
Next to a small creek (often dry) and sheltered from the winds, this campsite is great for those wanting to camp on Mt Solitary. For daywalkers, this spot offers the chance to rest under the overhangs of the cliffs before continuing. Water here is not reliable, please note that in the past water was more reliable, but not so now. Please carry plenty of water. There is a camping area near the beginning of the track and there are also a few spots along the gully where people have camped previously.

(9.67 km) Chinamans Gully campsite to Chinamans Gully view
Optional sidetrip: Route: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 388 m Time = 8 mins
Climb = 0 m Descent = -50 m
Turn left : From Chinamans Gully campsite, this walk follows the track north[100], keeping the rock walls to you right[101]. The track soon starts to head gently downhill, keeping the small gully on your left and passing through a number of sandstone camping caves[102][103]. The track then heads left to follow the gully downhill[104] for about 150m, and comes to a small clearing and campsite[105] at the junction of two creeks. The track then crosses the side creek[106] and heads gently up the side of the hill[107], coming to an unfenced filtered view up the Kedumba Valley to Katoomba[108].
(Retrace your steps back to the main track, then turn left to continue along this walk.)

Overnight stay Goto day 2 notes

Day 2


(9.67 km) Chinamans Gully campsite to Singa-Jingawell Creek Campsite
Route: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 1.81 km Time = 55 mins
Climb = 179 m Descent = -206 m
Continue straight: From the large campsite at the top of Chinamans Gully, this walk heads east up the gully[109], initially keeping the large main rock to your right (and Chinamans Gully to your left). The track leads up the short gully[110] to the top of the rock, where there is a filtered view[111](to your right). This walk follows the track as it winds up the hill for about 130m, passing another great view[112] (on your right). The track then mostly flattens out, following the top of the ridge for another 500m to pass a small campsite[113]. About 200m past this campsite, the track then passes a short track (on your left that provides great unfenced views over the Kedumba Valley[114]). Over the next 400m, the track continues east, fairly closely to the northern face of Mount Solitary, with the occasional gap in the trees to provide great views. The track alternately rises and falls, and passes the (not very noteworthy) summit[115] of Mount Solitary. From here, the track starts to lead down[116] a ridge, passing a few filtered views over about 500m, then comes to a large campsite[117], with a rock platform[118] (up to the left) that provides even more views[119].

Singa-Jingawell Creek Campsite Alt = 814 m
Singa-Jingawell Creek Campsite is near the northern wall, partway across the eastern half of Mount Solitary. The informal campsite sits in a pleasant little depression beside the small, usually dry creek. There is a rock platform at the top of the campsite that provides great views[120] up the Kedumba River towards Katoomba. There is a large fire scare[121], but this is in a fuel stove only area, so please avoid lighting any campfires. The creek gets a small amount of water in it after rain, but it does not last long, so always best to bring your own.

(11.48 km) Singa-Jingawell Creek Campsite to Solitary Pass
Route: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 1.19 km Time = 29 mins
Climb = 61 m Descent = -105 m
Continue straight: From Singa-Jingawell Creek Campsite, this walk heads south-east, initially keeping the rock wall to your left. After about 80m, this walk stays left (ignoring the track that crosses the creek). Here the track climbs the fairly short hill then follows the ridgeline for just over 100m to climb up the gully[122] beside the large rock formation[123], then climbs up a rock wall[124] (about 2-3m tall). There are some views (to the right) over Singa-Jingawell Creek valley[125]. The rocky track continues east for about 500m and then turns right, coming to a small ridgetop campsite[126] just over 100m later. Shortly after this campsite (just before a large rocky outcrop[127]), the walk turns left and starts to lead down the ridgeline, quite steeply in places[128], for about 250m and finds an intersection in a saddle, with a steep gully[129] on your left and a short climb to a rocky viewpoint[130][131] (and logbook[132][133]) straight ahead.

(12.67 km) Solitary Pass to Int of Kedumba Camping and Solitary Tracks
Route: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 1.2 km Time = 40 mins
Climb = 11 m Descent = -428 m
Turn left : From the saddle, this walk follows the eroded track very steeply down the gully[134] to the north. The track soon bends right[135] around the base of the cliff to find the ridge[136]. The walk follows the steep eroded track down the ridge for about 300m to where the track flattens out for a short time[137], then turns left to wind down through the casuarina forest[138]. The track winds down through this casuarina forest, very steeply and slippery in places[139] for about 800m, (turning right at the faint track intersection partway down) heading east to a flat area, campsite[140] and signposted intersection, where a 'Mount Solitary' sign[141] points back up the hill.

(13.87 km) Int of Kedumba Camping and Solitary Tracks to Kedumba River
Track: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 1.4 km Time = 31 mins
Climb = 2 m Descent = -206 m
Continue straight: From the intersection and campsite[142], this walk follows the 'Kedumba Pass'[143] and 'Kedumba River'[144] signs west, gently downhill along the ridge. After about 600m, just after passing between some boulders[145], the track starts to steepen[146] and leads down towards the views of the cliff[147] (on the far side of the valley), then mostly flattens out again[148]. This track then steeply descends[149] again, until the track bends right and comes to a beach on the south (western) side of the Kedumba River[150]. Here the walk crosses the river[151] (usually lower-shin deep, this river has a large catchment and may be impassable after rain). Once on the other side, this walk comes to a rocky beach and climbs over a large fallen tree[152] to see the main track continuing ahead and a little to the left (sometimes marked with a cairn[153]). There is a place that has been used as a campsite a short distance upstream[154] (not safe if there is a chance of the river rising), or there are a few alternative places to camp up the embankment[155].

(15.27 km) Kedumba River to Int of Kedumba River track and Sublime Point trail
Track: Hard - bushtrack
Length = 2.19 km Time = 1 hr 8 mins
Climb = 345 m Descent = -17 m
Continue straight: From the Kedumba River crossing, this walk follows the track (sometimes marked with a rock cairn[156]) north, up the embankment and away from the river. The track soon bends left and leads around the side of the flat area with a nice blue gum stand[157]. The track then starts to climb, steeply at first[158], for about 400m (passing some views back to the cliffs of Mount Solitary[159]) before flattening out[160]. The track then leads gently up through the open forest[161] for about 800m, where it then leads gently down to cross a small gully[162][163]. The track continues up the main ridge for another 400m then along the side of a narrow steep gully[164] (on your left). Near the top of this gully, the track turns left to cross the now small gully[165]. The track now leads north for a little while around the ridge and climbs the hill for another 500m, passing through a ferny forest, to find a yellow 'warning' sign[166]. From this sign, the track leads left and up the bank, coming to an intersection with the Sublime Point management trail, where a 'Mount Solitary' sign[167] points back along the track.

(17.46 km) Int of Kedumba River track and Sublime Point trail to End of Kedumba River Rd
Track: Moderate - servicetrail
Length = 3.58 km Time = 1 hr 36 mins
Climb = 388 m Descent = -75 m
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk follows the 'Wentworth Falls' sign[168] uphill along the wide management trail as it bends left. The trail leads past a small cave[169] (on your left) and further uphill, the trail bends right. Soon after, the trail leads down a short hill[170] to come to a clear three-way intersection[171] with a 'Leura via Fern Bower' sign[172] pointing back along the trail.
Turn left : From the intersection, this walk heads north, uphill along the management trail, following the sign to 'Wentworth Falls'. After the uphill section, the trail turns to the right and starts heading steeply up between the gap in the cliffs. The walk passes a locked gate and continues steeply up the hill until reaching the top, where the track curves around to the bends again sharply to the left - there are some great views from here. From the top of the cliffs, the track zigzags north along a relatively flat management trail until coming to the end of Kedumba Valley Rd, marked by a large towering gateway with small track around it.

(21.04 km) End of Kedumba River Rd to King's Tableland Intersection
Walk: Easy - road,servicetrail
Length = 5.18 km Time = 1 hr 41 mins
Climb = 163 m Descent = -102 m
Continue straight: From the end of Kedumba River Rd at the large archway, this walk heads north along the wide dirt road. This gradually curves around left (at the junction with Kings Tableland Rd, unsignposted), becoming Tableland Rd. The walk continues along Tableland Rd for some time, before coming into a more suburban area and turning left into Hordern Rd. At the far end of Hordern Rd, there is a 'T' intersection with a dirt road.
Turn right: From the end of Hordern Rd, this walk heads north along the management trail, away from the power lines, and after approximately 100m passes a large wire gate. Another 100m on from here, the trail passes a large green gate and sign saying 'Kings Tableland Track'. After this, the flat management trail continues until coming to an intersection with another management trail, signposted as the 'Rocket Point Track.

King's Tableland Alt = 853 m
The first point of Aboriginal and European contact in the Blue Mountains, King's Tableland is a significant Aboriginal meeting spot. Historical and cultural sites on the tableland include open campsites, occupation shelters, axe grinding grooves, stone arrangements and art sites, including cave paintings and rock engravings.

(26.21 km) King's Tableland Intersection to Top of Wentworth Falls
Track: Moderate - bushtrack
Length = 511 m Time = 13 mins
Climb = 7 m Descent = -63 m
Veer left: From the intersection, this walk follows the 'Rocket Point Track' sign north along the smaller management trail. As the track begins to go downhill, it narrows into a bush track. The track gently winds along until coming to an intersection with another bush track, marked by signs pointing to 'Rocket Point' and 'Wentworth Falls'.
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk heads east following the 'Wentworth Falls' sign down the narrow track towards the creek. The track turns left when it comes to a point above the creek and then follows this creek downstream to come to an intersection marked with a 'Round Walk' signpost.
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk follows the track away from the 'Round Walk' sign to zigzag down the hill a short distance to the well-managed and fenced track below (marked with a 'Rocket Point Circuit' pointing back up).
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk keeps the handrail on the left and cross a small creek using the stepping stones. The track soon leads to a large pool, Queen's Cascades and a fenced creek crossing, the top of Wentworth Falls.

Queen's Cascades Alt = 799 m
Queen's Cascades[173] are a lovely set of falls on the Jamison Creek at the top of Wentworth Falls. The creek heads down the wide, two-stage cascades into a sandy pool. From the pool, the water flows between the stepping stones, under the fence and down the very tall Wentworth Falls. There are also great views to Sublime Point across the valley.

(26.73 km) Top of Wentworth Falls to Weeping Rock waterfall
Track: Moderate - bushtrack
Length = 102 m Time = 2 mins
Climb = 10 m Descent = -3 m
Continue straight: From top of Wentworth Falls, this walk crosses the creek on the stepping stones keeping the view to the left (the creek may be impassable after rain). The walk heads up the log steps (passing some more nice views of Jamison Creek) to soon come to a three-way intersection, with a sign pointing back to 'Wentworth Falls' and 'Wentworth Pass'.
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk follows the 'Weeping Rock Circuit' and 'Darwins walk' signs up a few steps and between the rocks. The track soon leads to a great view of Weeping Rock, then heads down some steps onto a slippery rock platform, beside a pool at the base of Weeping Rock waterfall.

Weeping Rock Alt = 804 m
Weeping Rock is a waterfall on Jamison Creek, upstream of Wentworth Falls in the Blue Mountains National Park. The water falls over the wide circular top overhang, to then cascade down the rocks to a pool below. A staircase beside the falls helps walkers view this waterfall from different angles. This is a nice cool spot on hot days. The rocks are slippery and there are no fences, care is needed.

(26.83 km) Weeping Rock waterfall to Int of Charles Darwin and Weeping Rock Tracks
Track: Moderate - bushtrack
Length = 35 m Time = 1 mins
Climb = 2 m Descent = 0 m
Continue straight: From the bottom of Weeping Rock, this walk heads up the metal staircase (with the falls to the right). At the top of the falls, the track continues upstream, across the slippery rock platform, keeping the lovely view of Jamison Creek to the right. The track soon heads up some steps to an intersection with 'Darwins Walk' and a sign pointing back to 'Weeping Rock Circuit'.

(26.86 km) Int of Charles Darwin and Weeping Rock Tracks to Wentworth Falls Railway Station
Track: Moderate - bushtrack,footpath
Length = 2.65 km Time = 51 mins
Climb = 116 m Descent = -58 m
Veer right: From the intersection, this walk heads alongside Jamison Creek (creek to the right)following the signs along the Charles Darwin Walk. The track soon crosses two small streamlets and continues up the main creek along a mixture of bush track and boardwalk. This passes a great section of overhanging cliff on the other side of the creek. After this, the track rises slightly before going down to an intersection with a track signposted as the way up to Fletcher St, on the left.
Continue straight: From the intersection, this walk heads upstream beside the creek. This track goes along a mixture of boardwalk and bush track until continuing on a long section of boardwalk. The walk crosses the creek and goes up a steep set of stairs, then past a beautiful section of creek where the water cascades down the rocks.
Shortly the cascades, the track crosses the creek using a foot bridge and comes to a signposted intersection with 'Parkes Street' track (on the left).
From the intersection, this walk follows the clear track upstream (keeping the creek through the bush, on the right). The track bends right passing a bench seat and crossing the creek on a footbridge. On the other side of the bridge the walk climbs the stairs then gently meanders along the side of the creek till coming to a clearing. On the other side of the clearing the walk comes to an intersection just before the pipe bridge.
Continue straight: From the intersection, this walk follows 'Village' sign along the track and under the large pipeline (keeping Jamison Creek on the left). The track meanders alongside the creek over some timber platforms and through a lovely Banksia grove. After a short time the walk passes a 'Charles Darwin walk' sign and comes to an intersection with a timber bridge on the left of the track.
Turn right: From the intersection, this walk heads up the stairs (away from the bridge and creek) and turns left. The walk almost immediately comes to an intersection with a set of stairs (heading up to Page Ave on the right) and a sign pointing to 'Wilson Park'.
Continue straight: From the intersection, this walk follows 'Wilson Park' and 'Village' signs down some steps and along the track (keeping the creek to the left). The track soon passes a bush regeneration information sign and heads into an open pine forest. The walk then crosses the creek on a small timber bridge and heads up the hill. Soon the track passes under the 'Charles Darwin Walk' arch and enters Wilson Park (just next to the tennis courts).
Continue straight: From the the archway in Wilson Park, this walk heads away from the tennis courts, keeping the creek on the right. At the far end of the park, the walk comes to the Great Western Highway and turns right. After about 150m, this walk crosses the highway at the traffic lights and heads up Station St, past the shops and up to Wentworth Falls Railway Station on the right.

Catch the train from Wentworth Falls Station
Public transport (train) available from this Bushwalk Check out the facilities at Wentworth Falls Station
You can phone 131500 (the transport info line) for up to date running times.
Use these links to plan your train trip from the end of the walk.
Plan your trip to --> Castle Hill|Chatswood|Dural|Epping|Gosford|Hornsby|Katoomba|Manly|Parramatta|Penrith|Strathfield|Sutherland|Sydney|
Drive from Wentworth Falls Railway Station
You can drive or ride from this end of this Bushwalk There is free parking available.
You can drive or ride from the end of this walk
Use these links to plan your trip from the end of this walk.
Plan your trip to --> Castle Hill|Chatswood|Dural|Epping|Gosford|Hornsby|Katoomba|Manly|Parramatta|Penrith|Strathfield|Sutherland|Sydney|

Getting there

Plan your trip to the start of the walk and back from the end of the walk

Public Transport links currently not working, sorry
Public Transport Timetables

To the start of the walk

From
Castle Hill
Chatswood
Dural
Epping
Gosford
Hornsby
Katoomba
Manly
Parramatta
Penrith
Strathfield
Sutherland
Sydney
From the end of the walk

To
Castle Hill
Chatswood
Dural
Epping
Gosford
Hornsby
Katoomba
Manly
Parramatta
Penrith
Strathfield
Sutherland
Sydney

Driving Directions
Map Car Shuffle
To the start of the walk

Drive from:
From the end of the walk

Drive to:


Near by


Campsites in the park
Acacia Flat
Burralow Creek camping ground
Coxs River Camping Area
Euroka campground - Appletree Flat campervan and camper trailer area
Euroka campground
Ingar campground
Mount Werong campground
Murphys Glen campground
Perrys Lookdown campground
Euroka Campground - Darug
Euroka Campground - Red Gum
Euroka Campground - Nioka
Euroka Campground - Bennetts Ridge


Nearest know Outdoor Stores near the start of this walk
Store Address Phone Distance (straight line)
Paddy Pallin 166 Katoomba St , Katoomba (02) 4782 4466 1.7 km
Summit Gear 80- Bathurst Rd , Katoomba (02) 4782 3018 2 km
Summit Gear 11 Ross St , Glenbrook (02) 4739 4373 30 km
Simdra Pet & Hobby Mart 45 Main St , Lithgow (02) 6352 4422 30.5 km
Lithgow 4WD Centre 281 Main St , Lithgow (02) 6353 1899 30.8 km


A list of the nearest UHF CB repeaters I found to Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley.
Channel Call sign
(more info)
Site Distance and dir from Katoomba to Wentworth Falls via the Jamison Valley
Click to re-center search
5 BIN05 Fire Tower MT BINDO
Emergency use only
28 km (to the WNW)
7 VMC7 Fire Tower MT BINDO 28 km (to the WNW)
6 LGW06 Lithgow Council Site HASSANS WALLS 29 km (to the NNW)
4 RIV04 Fire Service Rusden Road MT RIVERVIEW 30 km (to the E)
2 KUR02 Miles Comms Site 1 1 246 Burralow Road KURRAJONG HEIGHTS 35 km (to the NE)

Weather and Park info

Fire Danger
This walk passes Greater Sydney Region fire area which currently has a LOW MODERATE rating and No fire ban in place.
(Tomorrow the Fire Danger Rating is LOW MODERATE, No fire ban.) (Downloaded 3 years ago)
Please Note: Each park may have its own fire ban, this rating is only valid for today and is based on information from the RFS Please check the RFS Website for more information.

Weather and Climate
Weather and Climate summary detailed weather and climate information here
°C (feels like °)
km/h from the
% humidity     (as at )
Wed      27°Showers. Likely storm developing.
Thu16°|26°Shower or two.
Fri15°|28°Mostly sunny.
Sat12°|22°Possible late shower.
A graph displaying the average daily temperature range for the year

Blue Mountains National Park Link to official closures and fire bans page
Attracting over 3 million visitors annually, Blue Mountains National Park holds some of Australia's most spectacular and diverse wilderness areas. Explore the Grose Valley, with its sheer sandstone cliffs, waterfalls and scenic walking, or enjoy the famous views of the Three Sisters. Easy access makes a day trips very worthwhile, but with such diversity it would be great to stay in one of the many B&B's and spend a few days soaking up the region.
Region: Sydney & Surrounds
Park fees Camping Facilities
Current Park Closure information for Blue Mountains National Park
Closure information last downloaded Sunday 27th of September 2015 07:00 AM
Closed areas: Grand Canyon walking track
The Grand Canyon walking track will be closed from Wednesday 14 October 2015 to mid-June 2016. The closure is necessary to allow work to continue on improving the walking track. Access for canyoners will be on weekends only. Access from Evans Lookout via Beauchamp Falls to the Grose Valley will remain open. Evans Lookout carpark, Loop carpark, and Neates Glen carpark will remain open. Penalties apply for non-compliance. For more information, please contact NPWS Blue Mountains Heritage Centre on (02) 47878877 or visit the NSW National Parks safety page for park safety guidelines.

Closed areas: Waratah Native Gardens
Waratah Native Gardens picnic area is closed for maintenance. This includes the Gorge Walking track. No access to the area is permitted.Penalties apply for non-compliance. For more information, please contact NPWS Hawkesbury area office on (02) 4588 2400 or visit the NSW National Parks safety page for park safety guidelines.

Closed areas: Prince Henry cliff walk, Leura
Blue Mountains City Council wishes to advise that Prince Henry cliff walk between Majestic lookout and the junction with the Leura Cascades walk is currently closed due to a landslip. Detours will be in place and clearly signposted around the affected area. Access from the Leura picnic area to the cascades is unaffected. For more information, please contact Blue Mountains City Tourism on 1300 653 408 or Blue Mountains Heritage Centre on (02) 4787 8877, or visit the NSW National Parks safety page for park safety guidelines.

Closed areas: Butterbox Swamp track
The traditional access to Butterbox Canyon via the endangered swamp is now closed and rehabilitated. No access permitted. Canyoners should use the new track provided. Temporary signage is in place.
Penalties apply for non-compliance. For more information, please contact Blue Mountains Heritage Centre on (02) 4787 8877 or visit the NSW National Parks safety page for park safety guidelines.

Closed areas: Claustral canyon access change
Access to Claustral canyon via the previous route across private land at Mount Tomah is no longer possible due to landholders denying access. Canyoners should respect the rights of Mount Tomah residents and avoid using private land. Alternative access from the west side of Mount Bell has been identified. For more information, please contact the Blue Moauntains Heritage Centre on (02) 4787 8877, open seven days 9am to 4.30pm, or visit the NSW National Parks safety page for park safety guidelines.

Closed areas: Cahills lookout - Katoomba
As a result of a recent bushfire, Cahills lookout remains closed until further notice. For more information, please contact Blue Mountains City Council on (02) 4780 5000.

Closed areas: Waratah Native Gardens
Waratah Native Gardens Some areas of this park are closed due to a major landslip event occurring across The Gorge Walking Track. Closed areas include The Gorge Walking Track in the Blue Mountains National Park. A full assessment is underway to determine the extent of damage and to ensure the area is made safe. The Gorge Walking Track is closed at the entry trackhead however the Waratah Native Gardens Day Use and Picnic Area located off Valley Ridges Road Berambing (west of Bilpin) has now been reopened. This closure may be extended and any extension will be posted as soon as possible. For more information, please contact NPWS Heritage Centre on (02) 4787 8877, open seven days 9am to 4.30pm, or visit the NSW National Parks safety page for park safety guidelines


Walker Feedback

Comments
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Tom Vale IP:124.176.119.xxx | 2008-03-31 17:38:43
Just did this walk over the weekend. A few notes for the track...

Chinamans Gully was a fairly poor water source (and it had rained the night before) with a very very small trickle going through the stream and a lot of it being almost still. I would recommend trying to carry enough to get you to Kedumba River (in the 2nd day).

The extremely steep descent in the 2nd day is as described very steep so please don't take that lightly. It is also quite lengthy (I would estimate 1-2km).

I also found the track hard to find after crossing Kedumba River and trying to make my way to the sublime point service trail. Once on top of the hill it was fine however the initial part immediately after the river was not very easy to see at all.
admin - re: water Super Administrator | 2008-04-02 10:19:59
Hi Tom

Thanks for the feedback, I updated the notes to make it clear that water is not reliable at Chinamans Gully. I will also make some change in the other section soon. Hope you enjoyed the walk.

Tom Vale wrote:
Just did this walk over the weekend. A few notes for the track...

Chinamans Gully was a fairly poor water source (and it had rained the night before) with a very very small trickle going through the stream and a lot of it being almost still. I would recommend trying to carry enough to get you to Kedumba River (in the 2nd day).

The extremely steep descent in the 2nd day is as described very steep so please don't take that lightly. It is also quite lengthy (I would estimate 1-2km).

I also found the track hard to find after crossing Kedumba River and trying to make my way to the sublime point service trail. Once on top of the hill it was fine however the initial part immediately after the river was not very easy to see at all.
kevin toto IP:221.133.196.xxx | 2008-08-18 08:04:42
Very challenging track I must add

from Ruined castle to Mt Solitary lookout there are 2 steep ROCK CLIMBs one just after a campsite on the righthand side while going up the hill (1 km climb) and 300m before you get to the top of Mt Solitary lookout campsite (approx.1km climb again)

Chinamans Gully the track via's off to the right theres a campsite 100m to the left there under shelter if u dnt have windproof tents, I was fortunate enough to hear people having a party there to see it. but if you do turn right 200m there is a clearing with 2 camp fireplaces and a giant rock with a big hole on the rightside of it ( I camped there :) ). Well on the leftside of that rock is the start of Day 2 track that goes up into hill. (took me 15mins trying to find it :x )

The Extremely Steep descent is very dangerous if your not careful be WARNED!!!! it is all downhill from here to the Kedumba River

Kedumba River there are 2 tracks heading into the hills from here the most obvious is the one on the right side ( i followed it and got lost so i turned back to the river) dont go up that one, there is a track on the left side (very hard to see) if u had walked thru
river and jumped over the log then the track in front of you marked with a pile of rocks thats the track, if u had walked over the big tree to cross the river you'll see a track in front of u ( dont go up that track) walk past the campfire there heading up river 50m and on your right theres a pile of rocks to mark the track thats the one u need ( its all uphill from here )

from Kedumba River to Horden rd
was the most challenging part of the walk constantly walking uphill thinking the road is on the next bend. ( dont get your hopes up ) once it gets to the servicetrail rd thats when the fun starts :D :D :D

GOOD LUCK :D

it took me twice the time it was estimated on the notes dunno if it was because i was carrying 25kg pack or if i was just not upto the level of fitness the track was intended for, without the pack yea definitely would of done the estimated time. but yeah can someone check those times again

lol lol lol

very challenging track indeed :wink:
Simon IP:210.23.146.xxx | 2009-01-27 11:28:27
Hi, we just did the walk over the weekend. We managed to follow the track notes all the way until we reached civilization and then got lost. I found the notes very cryptic at this stage. We reached the old hospital and bitumen road and assumed we had missed the turnoff as it was still being referred to as a "track" even though it is quite a main road with a double line. Also there are no street signs down that end. So we doubled back and went up some side track to a dead end. Eventually a friendly local on a pushbike showed us the way. It also took us almost double the time. Good walk though, thanks...
Charles Mire IP:130.130.37.xxx | 2009-01-27 11:49:33
I just did this walk over Australia Day weekend. I brought 3 liters of water thinking it would be enough to last until I found a proper water source -- but since this was the middle of summer and was VERY hot, I ended up going through 2.5 liters the first day. I can confirm the unreliability of the creeks in Chinamen's Gully. They were bone dry all the way to the edge of the cliff.

Since I was unsure about water for the second half of the walk, I decided to turn back after camping overnight.

Overall, though, I thought the walk was nice. There are definitely lots of great views. Although I can't comment on the second half of the walk, I can say I didn't think the first half was terribly difficult (but it was a good workout). Navigation wasn't an issue, as the trail is very obvious. The toughest part of the trail up to the Ruined Castle was the first 10 meters. The climb up Mt. Solitary seemed to go on for awhile. The overall difficulty of the first day's trail was definitely increased due to the heat. But in cooler temperatures, I don't think it would be bad.

I will definitely do the walk again to completion, but not in summer.
troiks Registered | 2009-05-18 09:37:59
Hi

Just did this walk & all the comments that have been made above are correct.

The second day was the most challenging with a steep descent followed by a few hours of climbing out of the valley. I feel that the track notes have underestimated the times on the second day but if you start early it doesnt really matter

If you do this walk consider catching a taxi at the end once you reach the top of the service trail. We were picked up from the locked gate / entry to the national park & were dropped off at the pub.... the most interesting parts of the walk had already been done by this stage & we did not feel like walking on sealed roads.

Quick note to the site admin - awsome sight, greatly appreciated. How about mentioning where the closest pub is at the end of every walk

Cheers
admin - re: Super Administrator | 2009-05-18 10:07:08
troiks wrote:
Hi
Quick note to the site admin - awsome sight, greatly appreciated. How about mentioning where the closest pub is at the end of every walk
Cheers

Thanks for the kind words. The pub idea is great. I have added this to the todo list (also added coffee shop, accommodation) Can you let me knwo wich sections took longer than suggested (and how long it took you), I will look into that further.
Thanks
Matt :)
troiks Registered | 2009-05-18 15:15:58
Hi Matt

From the top of the cliffs to the Kedumba river took about 1.5 hours.

From the river to the arched gate at the entrance to the park took about 3.5 hours.

I guess time taken depends on the walkers, the track notes were not to far off. I was carrying a pack weighing 14kg & we did stop to rest...... other (fitter) people would probably do it quicker than what we did.

Cheers

PS. Would be happy to volunteer if you ever need any help with info or research for the site
admin - re: Super Administrator | 2009-05-18 15:23:23
troiks wrote:
I guess time taken depends on the walkers, the track notes were not to far off. I was carrying a pack weighing 14kg & we did stop to rest...... other (fitter) people would probably do it quicker than what we did.
PS. Would be happy to volunteer if you ever need any help with info or research for the site

Thanks Troiks.
Sounds about right, I have prob not made it clear the time given do not include rest time (just walking time). Need to think about how i make that clearer. Great walk though :)
Thanks for your offer of help with research. At this stage the best help I can get is from people telling others about wildwalks (to make it more popular) and to keep giving feedback like you are (even when things are right). I hope to start adding walks again in the next few months.
Matt :)
troiks Registered | 2009-05-18 15:54:12
No probs, just gave your site a plug on whirlpools lifestyle forum. you will need to join to see this forum

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=1203893
lala - questions IP:110.32.184.xxx | 2009-09-27 12:20:18
:D hye im planning to do this track.roughly how much is the cost and what are the things that i u guys think i might need.any advice?
admin - re: questions Super Administrator | 2009-09-27 22:47:00
lala wrote:
roughly how much is the cost and what are the things that i u guys think i might need.any advice?

There is no charge for doing this walk, just you own food, travel equipment cost etc. In terms of gear, this is a fairly remote overnight walk, that requires navigation skill and experience in such environments. Perhaps you can find a friend with the experience or join a club (assuming you do not have the experience yourself). Otherwise it is a fairly standard overnight walk in terms of equipment. But do expect to find water on or before the Kedumba River.
Chris IP:123.200.193.xxx | 2010-02-11 06:36:54
Just did this walk the other day / night.

All I can say is one very challenging walk , be sure to bring salt and a lighter to keep the leeches away especially before ruined castle where I noticed there was quite a few.

I can say probably the hardest parts where the climb to mt solitary and on the next day from Kedumba river to the service trail.

When I went there had been severe rain for the last week and the campsite at keduma river had been washed away so we just kept walking and finished the walk on day 2. However if you did want to camp id recomend after the intersection on the service trail where it says great western highway left , theres a flat level campsite that would be go to spend a night.

Also after chinamans gully the walk becomes very difficult to follow and theres a few paths going everywhere , after about 30mins - 1 hour of walking from chinamans gulley you';ll come across a campsite with a ford falcon hubcap where people have carved there names and trip dates , shortly after this if you cross a small creek to the south your going the wrong way , head up the left path instead , I went up the wrong path and was lost for ages lol

But yes , this is a very very hard walk and i didnt think id make it at times , but the views are great at the end of mt solitary and you can fill in the log book and rest before the huge descent.

Also , chinamans gully did have tons of water in the creek when i was there , but that was most likely due to rainfall lately , check the rainfall amount of the area before embarking upon this journey !

Good luck and cheers to a great website here !
tim - mr IP:192.250.153.xxx | 2010-08-09 03:07:47
Did this walk mid July this 2010 (middle of winter!)

fantastic walk, went with a friend ,was my first over night hike..

The walk wasn't hard... but definately wasn't easy either.. we camped at the very top of Mt Solitary with views to die for! had a 1,000m cliff with the campsit 10 15 metres back, awesome!

2nd day the les were fair jelly.. but once moving was all good. we took enough water for 1 day and filled up down at Kedumba river.. long hike down... but well worth it.. cup of tea at the river and morning snacks was great..

We couldn't get a taxi from the old hospital and ended up walking to wentworth falls train station, what an effort that was!

Couldn't walk on the Monday afterwards, but would definately reccomend this to anyone willing to put in a few hard yards
bryan & maya - be prepared IP:153.107.33.xxx | 2010-10-06 05:35:59
We attempted this walk one week ago. Instructions were helpful. However we only made it to near the top of Mt Solitary. We felt under prepared for just the ascent/scrambling and with a force 10 gale, a rope would have been handy to steady our nerves. We turned back at about 2 pm and probably still half hour from getting to the top? Found the lack of signs a bit challenging (is that to be expected?)and to tell you the truth my legs were cramping - some gatrorade/electrolytes would have helped. On the way "up" we saw one "arrow" carved in the rock. Earlier we had run into a scout group who had made it to Chinamen's gulley but they did not mention the need for rope. It was only when we reached the "climb" that we met a father & son (probably Abraham & Issac) who mentioned the likely need for ropes given our packs. I also had a "Picnic at Hanging Rock" experience when returning to break the news we should turn around - had to shout out to my daughter to get my bearings!. Based on the various accounts of getting off Mt Solitary and onwards ... to Wentworth Falls, I am very glad (and of course a little disappointed) that we turned back ... and camped near the base of the Ruined Castle. Please note, even in this sheltered valley the wind howled through the night!
QUESTION 1: Is there a way around Mt Solitary?
QUESTION 2: Should the NPWS located some discrete directional signage (without spoiling the adventure)?
SUGGESTION: see "Tomorrow When the War Began" and you think you've on a journey to "Hell"
Best of Luck. Do not rush the journey. Carry at least 3 litres. Always have an exit strategy ie turn around.
admin - re: be prepared Super Administrator | 2010-10-06 22:59:56
bryan & maya wrote:

QUESTION 1: Is there a way around Mt Solitary?
QUESTION 2: Should the NPWS located some discrete directional signage (without spoiling the adventure)?

Hi Bryan & Maya
We must have been walking within a day of each other, I was wandering here at a similar time to update the notes (update will be published soon). It is a challenging walk. This is a class 5 walk, which means the park managers put little if any signs up and that there will be little if any other infrastructure to help you along the way. Note the black diamond for the grade of this walk - this appears for class 5 and 6 walks (click on the diamond for more info about the grading system). As for another way around solitary, avoiding the climb, fraid not, there is a very long way around, that takes you back via the cliffs below katoomba, but that is a 2 or three day walk. Sounds like you are still upbeat about the experience, hopefully the next walk will be more like you expect.
Matt :)
bryan & maya - re: be prepared IP:153.107.33.xxx | 2010-10-07 01:10:17
thanks Matt ... we found it a great experience except for the disappointment of not fulfilling the plan ... I probably expected more direction/understanding in the climbing ... and if we'd succeeded to the top of Mt Solitary ... the same going down? Given our inexperience in the area it's a catch22 for providing information/directions without spoiling the challenge/achievement
Regards Bryan & Maya :)
admin wrote:
bryan & maya wrote:

QUESTION 1: Is there a way around Mt Solitary?
QUESTION 2: Should the NPWS located some discrete directional signage (without spoiling the adventure)?

Hi Bryan & Maya
We must have been walking within a day of each other, I was wandering here at a similar time to update the notes (update will be published soon). It is a challenging walk. This is a class 5 walk, which means the park managers put little if any signs up and that there will be little if any other infrastructure to help you along the way. Note the black diamond for the grade of this walk - this appears for class 5 and 6 walks (click on the diamond for more info about the grading system). As for another way around solitary, avoiding the climb, fraid not, there is a very long way around, that takes you back via the cliffs below katoomba, but that is a 2 or three day walk. Sounds like you are still upbeat about the experience, hopefully the next walk will be more like you expect.
Matt :)
zeph - water... IP:203.10.224.xxx | 2010-12-18 06:06:29
gyday bushwalkers intending this in summer....

YOU WILL NEED MINIMUM 4LTRS WATER PER PERSON PER DAY.

IF YOU CAN NOT CARRY 8LTRS WATER THEN DONT DO THIS WALK.
admin - re: water... Super Administrator | 2010-12-19 21:25:43
zeph wrote:
YOU WILL NEED....

Carrying plenty of water is very important in this area, Especially when hot and dry. The amount you need will vary greatly on the conditions. The only reliable source of water is on the second day down at the Kedumba River. Make sure you treat any water before drinking, and have a great walk.
Matt :)
Timberland - Anyone completed this overnigh IP:114.72.232.xxx | 2011-03-11 14:04:57
Has anyone completed this overnight hike in reverse? Was curious if perhaps spending more time exploring Darwin's Walk area on the way in might be fun, and then catching the scenic Skyway out of the valley. Has anyone completed this trek in that direction or could comment on how it might turn out?
admin - re: Anyone completed this over Super Administrator | 2011-03-14 03:12:57
Timberland wrote:
Has anyone completed this overnight hike in reverse?

Hi Timberland
I haven't but a few months ago I walked along the trail through the Kedumba Valley to Katoomba, A wide trail, but nice what to explore the valley. Doing it in reverse is not a bad option, as you can pick up water from the Kedumba before the big climb up. It is two pretty big first day, so give yourself plenty of time, consider camping beside near the Kedumba and save the climb over the top when fresh in the morning.
Matt :)
Christian - Getting Lost after Chinamans G IP:124.169.20.xxx | 2011-03-14 12:04:09
I did the walk over the weekend and loved it, the only comment I would make is that perhaps the description of where to go after chinamans gully should read starting at the top of chinamans gully looking at the big rock on your right and chinamans gully on your left up the left handside of the big rock. As I found myself walking around several tracks at the bottom of chinamans gully searching for the way. Otherwise all the track notes were very helpful. Well done on the website.
admin - re: Getting Lost after Chinama Super Administrator | 2011-03-14 21:13:37
Christian wrote:
I did the walk over the weekend and loved it, ...... I found myself walking around several tracks at the bottom of chinamans gully searching for the way. Otherwise all the track notes were very helpful. Well done on the website.

Hi Christian
Thanks for the comment, glad you had a good time, sorry for the detour.
I have tweaked the notes to make it clearer that it is from the top of Chinamans gully.
I think the bit that was extra confusing is the green box side trip, these are just a one way optional side trip. On any of the wildwalks notes when you walking along a side trip, retrace your steps back to the main track to then continue.
Anyway check the notes hopefully it is clearer now. Thanks again for taking the time to make it better for the next person.

Matt :)
Mezza - Track notes IP:125.255.40.xxx | 2011-05-18 02:25:42
Hey there
Did the walk earlier in the week. Track notes were great to follow. One change is that the cairn marking the track after crossing the Kedumba River is no longer there. Jump over the big fallen log and the trampled track is obvious leading up the bank. Also on top of Solitary - we were lucky to have water flowing in both Chinamans Gully and Singajingwell Creek. But I would not expect it to last. Fab walk
Mezza
admin - re: Track notes Super Administrator | 2011-05-18 02:42:47
Mezza wrote:
Hey there
Did the walk earlier in the week. Track notes were great to follow. One change is that the cairn marking the track after crossing the Kedumba River is no longer there. ...... Fab walk
Mezza

Hey Mezza
Thanks for the feedback, glad you had a good time, I loved doing this walk. I have tweaked the notes to say that the track is sometimes marked with a cairn (chances are one will be built again) and made it a little more descriptive to point out the track. Good to hear there was water up there, maybe one day it will become a reliable spring again, but for now we should carry plenty of water.
Thanks again
Matt :)
Troiks - Great walk IP:61.14.187.xxx | 2011-05-22 21:29:44
Did this for the second time on the weekend however made it a a 3 dayer so I could do some exploring. TYrack notes are spot on & there was plenty of water on Solitary.

Hi Matt, in a previous post you mentioned walking on a fire trail through the valley. I am assuming that this is the road that goes all the way to Leura. How long did it take & are there any spots to pitch a tent on the way?

Cheers
admin - re: Great walk Super Administrator | 2011-05-22 23:31:52
Troiks wrote:
Did this for the second time on the weekend however made it a a 3 dayer so I could do some exploring. TYrack notes are spot on & there was plenty of water on Solitary.
Hi Matt, in a previous post you mentioned walking on a fire trail through the valley. I am assuming that this is the road that goes all the way to Leura. How long did it take & are there any spots to pitch a tent on the way?Cheers

Hi Troiks
Glad the notes where good. It is about full days walk from the Keduma River to Leura along the management trail. I have the notes I just haven't put them up on the system, must have got distracted at some point. Please email me (matt@wildwalks.com) and I will try to put the notes up this week, then I can e-mail you when it is done.
Thanks (and thanks for your regular feedback).
Matt :)
Cameron - 11am at Katoomba IP:123.243.207.xxx | 2011-06-08 07:35:56
Hi mate,

We have to be back in Katoomba by 11am Sunday and was wondering where is a good place to make camp on the Saturday night that will allow us to do this. any feedback from anyone would be appreciated.

thx in advance

Cam
admin - re: 11am at Katoomba Super Administrator | 2011-06-08 08:39:11
Cameron wrote:
Hi mate,
We have to be back in Katoomba by 11am Sunday and was wondering where is a good place to make camp on the Saturday night that will allow us to do this. any feedback from anyone would be appreciated.
thx in advance
Cam

If you are on starting walking Sat AM and finish walking by 11am on Sunday, I think you will be pushing it. Perhaps starting walking from Golden Stairs, and leave a car or organise a lift from the end of Kedumba River Rd.
If you have two nights out planned then consider this route http://www.wildwalks.com/bushwalking-and-hiking-in-nsw/blue-mountains-katoomba/mt-solitary-and-kedumba-valley-circuit.html and stay at one of the campsites closer to Katoomba.
Hope that helps.
Matt :)
Cam - re: re: 11am at Katoomba IP:123.243.207.xxx | 2011-06-10 02:18:55
Thanks Matt, that was a huge help. A loop sounds much better and doesn't rely on transport to get us back to the start point.
I should have mentioned that we are starting to walk on Friday morning and finishing on Sunday 11am @ Katoomba. Your suggested loop looks great and day 3 looks like its only about 4.5 hrs walk back to katoomba...nice.thx again Matt
Dmitry - GPX track? IP:202.156.11.xxx | 2011-08-03 19:40:38
Hi guys, does anyone have the GPX track of this walk?
Brendan - Vehicle Access IP:124.171.28.xxx | 2011-09-14 12:41:30
Q: is there any vehicle access near the end of DAY1 /start Day 2 through the maze of NP access roads that dont have locked gates on them?
admin - re: Vehicle Access Super Administrator | 2011-09-14 20:29:27
Brendan wrote:
Q: is there any vehicle access near the end of DAY1 /start Day 2 through the maze of NP access roads that dont have locked gates on them?

Hi Brandan
The trails in the area are all locked, not just by NPWS but also to protect the water catchment. The campsite is in a remote location, not close to any trail access. The next public road access is at the 20km mark.
Hope that helps
Matt :)
Patrick - Great Walk IP:149.24.24.xxx | 2011-10-24 03:13:48
We just did this walk over the weekend with a group of 10 of us... It is a fantastic walk but also a bit challenging (which is great) if you have not done too many walks. I would cite day 2 from Chinaman's Gully where we camped overnight, to the start of the waterboard / access road as the highlight.

A couple of comments though:

- although we found water at Chinamen's Gully and sterilised it and it was fine, I can see that carrying enough water until Kedumba river is definitely advisable...

- be prepared for the steep descent down to the Kedumba river and the steady ascent thereafter...

- It might be worthwhile doing a car shuffle (or calling a cab!) where the bitumen starts jut near the old hospital... It was a bit of a slog back to Wentworth Falls once you are past the ' towering gates'

But overall, it was great fun ! Highly recommended
Richo - General Info. IP:124.169.140.xxx | 2011-12-30 05:16:59
Myself and a mate just completed this hike[2 night version} our first one , found the endless climbing hard and the big descent into Kedumba river very testing. Took approx 6 ltrs water each which just lasted to Kedumba river.Our packs weighed approx 25kg each which obviously made the hike harder.Found the tracknotes very accurate although some of the climbs seemed longer and steeper than suggested.Turn off track at Chinamans Gully was hard to find and we lost an hour roaming around getting frustrated it needs a sign or arrow or paint or something. I am 45 and thought i was fit for my age due to alot of cycling but this was a very hard slog,but it sure felt good to get out of that very steep valley[Kedumba]and reach the main gate.We were lucky to get a lift from there back to Scenic Railway to get our car, so we did'nt have to hike right in to Wenty Falls. If you can i suggest to get picked up from the gate or leave a car there prior.All in all we were very proud to do it but physically broken at the end.Good luck.....
admin - re: General Info. Super Administrator | 2011-12-30 05:57:42
Richo wrote:
Myself and a mate just completed this hike. our first one , found the endless climbing hard and the big descent into Kedumba river very testing........

Hi Richo
Glad you enjoyed the challenging walk. You picked a challenging walk for your first time, sounds very hard with 25kg packs as well :) Thanks for the feedback. glad the notes where helpful. Any feedback on how to make the notes clearer at Chinaman's Gully would be appreciated. It is a funny intersection.
Matt :)
Morgs - General Info IP:124.149.61.xxx | 2011-12-30 10:36:49
I would add that it is extremely important that people be aware how important water is.

The only 2 places where wtaer is available between the start and end point is at the very bottom of chinamans gully (near the waterfall off the cliff on the toppo map) and at Kedumba River (and from previous accounts chinamans gully is very unpredictable).

My advice is that each person has at least 4 (preferably 6) litres of water for the trip between Ruined castle and Kedumba River. Make sure you take purifying tablets!!!

As for the route from chinamans gully onwards I would write the track notes like this:

"When you first reach the bottom of the descent from the Korroowall Knife Edge down to chinamans gully, directly in front of you is a large cave with a fireplace and writing all over the wall:

1) To get to the Chinaman's Gully creek and campsite turn immediately left whilst facing this graffiti'd wall: there are a number of trails that lead down the middle of the gully and under the cliff (and more caves and fireplaces) to the Chinamans gully Campsite and creek.

2) To continue up Mount Solitary: Turn immediately to your right at the foot of and facing this graffiti'd wall: the track up Mount Solitary peels of to the left 10 or 20 meters past the right hand side of this grafiti'd wall and winds up the hill from there."

I'd like top point out that the scariest part of the walk is the ascent up the knife edge. There is nothing truly vertical but there is some difficult scrambling up rocks and through cracks and my advice from my own experiences learnt the hard way is; unless you are very confident and fit at dealing with heights and scrambling up rocks etc make sure you don't do this walk alone as I did hahaha.

Also make sure you hire an emergency beacon for free from Katoomba Police Station.

This truly is a difficult but rewarding walk. Everyone you see along the path knows this and there is a great deal of respect between strangers up there for that reason. It really adds to the adventure. It was so great to meet some great people up there who could all acknowledge each others different reasons for being there whilst respecting their effort in getting there there.

PS Thanks heaps for the noodles, beans, and conversation to Richo and Kurt. I hope you boys aren't still feeling that extra hour at chinaman's haha. See you boys soon!!
Frances Bottrell - Day Walk IP:124.149.119.xxx | 2012-03-29 21:51:44
Just did this as a day walk, last Sunday, which took about 10.5 hours at a steady pace. The track is clearly marked and with the help of the notes we were not lost once. Very challenging but fabulous walk. Well worth the effort.
Sachin IP:58.106.79.xxx | 2012-04-18 13:39:17
hey I'm planning doing this walk and I'm looking for topographic maps... where would i find these?
admin - re: Super Administrator | 2012-04-19 09:46:41
Sachin wrote:
hey I'm planning doing this walk and I'm looking for topographic maps... where would i find these?

Hi Sachin
You can get the Katoomba and Jamison topo maps from most camping or hiking shops. There is also a topomap just for this walk as part of the walks PDF.
Happy walking
Matt :)
Alex - Single day IP:203.221.130.xxx | 2012-05-04 08:28:57
Hi Matt,

Do you think it is possible to pass this track for a single day? How would you describe the level of fitness one should have before such a challenge? Recently I passed a track of 38km in Royal National Park for 1 day with occasional running. But that track was relatively flat and I didn't have a back-pack.
Thanks

Regards
Alex
admin - re: Single day Super Administrator | 2012-05-05 00:46:44
Alex wrote:
Hi Matt,
Do you think it is possible to pass this track for a single day?.....

Hi Alex
Hope you are well.
I have known a couple of VEEERY fit people to do this walk in a day. The both did it during summer (when days are longer), and I think it took them about 16hrs at a solid pace. The climb over Solitary is much harder than anything on RNP coast walk, and this walk is much more remote with no out options like in RNP.
I did it as a two day walk and enjoyed that but even then it was fair pace.
A more popular day trip (but still a full solid day) is to go from Golden Step over Solitary to meet a car (that you left earlier) on the road at Kings Tablelands.
Hope that helps.

Matt :)
Alex IP:203.219.45.xxx | 2012-05-07 13:28:20
Hi Matt,
Thank you for your reply.
I think I shouldn't try to pass this track for 1 day until I am able to pass the RNP coastal walk for 5 hours.
Regards
Alex
Michael IP:143.119.162.xxx | 2012-05-15 03:04:56
We did this walk on the weekend…what cracking views!

I am around 40 and not super fit—although I have done a couple of conditioning overnighters— I didn’t find this walk too hard. The Knife Edge was a challenge, but managed it fine, even with a 22kg backpack; rope would have been overkill.

The most difficult part of the journey is back down the other side of the mountain from Solitary Pass…the inclinations are steep, the surface is littered with slippery acacia needles and the decent is relentless. Very hard on the knees and a walking pole is a must. Still, we managed it ok, with just one (partially controlled) slide!

The second day is magic; there were crowds galore on day one, but on the second day we saw just one other person the whole way.

Thank you for the track notes and maps which, as usual, are highly accurate. My only offering for slight improvement is the description of the exit from Chinaman’s Gully. I would amend it to read:

Code:
From the large campsite at the top of Chinamans Gully, this walk initially heads east north up down the gully, initially keeping the large main rock to your right (and Chinamans Gully to your left). The Shortly the track turns right just before another (graffitied) rock leads leading east up the a short gully embankment to the top of the rock, where there is a filtered view (to your right) ] 


There was plenty of good quality water both at Chinamans Gully and at Singa-jingla-well.

Please keep up the excellent work.
Michael - re: previous IP:143.119.162.xxx | 2012-05-15 03:09:10
Sorry, that didn't work try this:

[QUOTE]From the large campsite at the top of Chinamans Gully, this walk initially heads [STRIKE]east[/STRIKE] north [STRIKE]up[/STRIKE] down the gully, [STRIKE]initially[/STRIKE] keeping the large main rock to your right (and Chinamans Gully to your left). [STRIKE]The[/STRIKE] Shortly the track turns right just before another (graffitied) rock [STRIKE]leads[/STRIKE] leading east up [STRIKE]the[/STRIKE] a short [STRIKE]gully[/STRIKE] embankment to the top of the rock, where there is a filtered view (to your right)[/QUOTE]
admin - Notes update Super Administrator | 2012-05-15 06:47:15
Hi Michael
Thanks for the feedback, glad you had a good time and did not loose to much skin sliding down off Solitary - it is steep hey :)

Leaving the Chinaman's Gully area is a funny one hey. I am not sure I agree with your suggestion for notes updating, but clearly it does need to be made clearer.
I think the spot we are talking about is from that large clearing at the top of Chinaman's gully (a popular camping area). From there I think it is actually ESE to this gully
http://www.wildwalks.com/i.html?image_id=314732
Are we talking about the same point??
Thanks
Matt :)
Rodos - Well worth the effort IP:58.173.136.xxx | 2012-09-24 11:12:49
What an amazing walk. Completed this last weekend. Followed the notes which where easy and accurate. The view are something to behold. There were a few people on the track first day but only one other on the second.

At Chinamans Gully look for the cross on the rock and walk past it on the right to the lookout which is a very short distance. It looks out over the water catchment area for the dam and it has one of the widest and largest vistas you will see. Simply stunning.

We camped at the Singa-Jingawell Creek campsite. We found a ledge that looked over the valley. At night we watched the lights of Katoomba flickering in the distance. For breakfast we had the sun shining onto the fog in the valley. It was just fabulous.

You want to be fit with good legs. But suffer the pain, its worth every step!
Dmitry - Great walk IP:201.232.124.xxx | 2012-11-12 04:14:12
I did it in a single day in winter. It is doible in a day but it means walking with very few stops. I really recommend to have GPS with route preloaded as navigation in places is difficult. If you plan to do it as a speed hike it is essential to carry enough water (I would say 4 liters) and to pack headlamp (just in case) the last part is the easiest and you you want could be aborted with shorter route to the wenthwoth falls station (free garmin map of lambertus is good, as has most of these trails and should you need to abort you could use GPS to find the shortest route)
Ash - Ash IP:124.187.178.xxx | 2013-06-28 00:11:58
Has anyone done this walk in the wet or just after rain?

Wondering how the steep sections are when wet.
admin - re: Ash Super Administrator | 2013-06-28 00:57:27
Ash wrote:
Wondering how the steep sections are when wet.

Hi Ash
The steep sections will get a bit more slippery but a slower pace will help there. The main issue after rain is crossing the creeks. The Kedumba can become impassable and you will either need to walk around, backtrack or wait it out. Some of the other creeks can become impassable as well. But this is usually only after heavy or prolonged rain.
Matt :)
Tristan - Tough day IP:137.111.13.xxx | 2014-05-12 02:47:26
We did this yesterday, starting at the Furber Steps at 6.30am and arriving at Wentworth Falls station a little after 6.30pm. It's a very full, tough day with a lot of ascent and descent.

The track seems to be well marked now, we didn't have a problem following it and only got the tracknotes out a couple of times during the day. The track down Mt Solitary was clearly defined (but very steep!) and we picked up the trail easily enough after the Keduma river. I still recommend taking a map, compass and EPIB (available for free from Katoomba police station, which is open 24/7). If you find yourself bush-bashing then you've gone the wrong way.

At least a third of the track (10km of the final 12km) is along a road, including the climb back out of the valley. This is a bit of a slog but there's no other option, aside from back-tracking or taking the even longer road to Katoomba.

As others have said, you will need a LOT of water. We did it on a relatively mild day but still went through many litres. Kedumba river was the only obvious source of water along the way, and that needs to be treated.

The views from Ruined Castle, Chinaman's Gully and the lookout just after the first locked gate are REALLY nice, some of the best I've seen in the Blue Mountains. Really great walk... despite the soul-destroying road walking :)
Rob - My walk IP:60.241.244.xxx | 2015-03-01 23:53:18
Firstly, a big thanks to the admin and to all the contributors.

I completed this stunning walk over the weekend, camping overnight at Chinaman's Gully. The views were to die for. For context, I'm a moderately fit, 29 yr old.

Notes:

Difficulty - I've done a fair bit of walking and this track was definitely punishing. The first day I found manageable. Due to fatigue and the amount of ascent / descent, I found the second day really tough. I had to take frequent breaks as I was overheating and had already finished the 3L of water I collected at the Kedumba river.

Knees - the amount of ascent / descent inflamed an old knee injury. It caused discomfort, but I was still able to walk. If you have knees problems, I wouldn't recommend this track.

The track - I found it very easy to follow, including the exit out of Chinaman's Gully campsite. There are yellow marking on a rock pointing where to go (up!). The only difficulty I found was when ascending the Korrowal knife-edge. The path was clear, but it was taking me longer than recommended and I thought that maybe I had veered off course; I hadn't.

The climb up the Knife Edge - not as bad as I thought it would be!

Water - I took 3L, intending to fill up at Kedumba. I made it, but to be comfortable I would take 4L-5L. Seems a lot for one day, but it isn't, particularly in the summer heat.

Camping at Chinaman's Gully - if you stay here, set up camp and then go further up the track about 5 mins to watch an amazing sunset over the valley south with views of the river and lake. Amazing.

Leeches - only 2 near Ruined Castle.

Hope that helps!
Kenny - Excellent but very tough 2 day IP:118.211.217.xxx | 2015-08-29 07:13:47
My wife and I (both aged around 40) did this on the weekend of 22nd September 2015 with 20kg packs. The first day is relatively easy, although the side-trip up to Ruined castle is a short, sharp ascent and descent that adds about half an hour. I'm a nervous scrambler, and was dreading the Korrowal Knife Edge, but it was nowhere near as bad as I was expecting, even the 3 or 4 rock chimneys were easy to ascend, with only one requiring our packs to be removed. Chinaman's Gully is a nice sheltered campsite - there were small water pools nearby, but they needed purifying. The descent next day to the river is hard work - poles highly recommended, or even just a stout stick, since it's extremely steep and quite slippery with leaves. The river was mid-calf high and rather cold, and again poles making fording it easier. From the river, the path is pretty much up hill for 3 hours all the way back to the escarpment, and it was pretty brutal. The last segment of the walk is just a dull and prolonged pavement-pounding exercise, which we were glad to skip by hitching a hide to the station. Avoid that part of the walk if you feel like it, since it's a pretty disappointing end to an otherwise superb walk.
Travis - Spectacular Views IP:122.149.144.xxx | 2015-09-14 10:18:14
This weekend my Girlfriend, our Friend and I did the first day of the walk, camping at Chinaman’s Gully and walked back the next day. The start of the walk from Scenic World until the accent up Mt Solitary is very easy (we decided to give Ruined Castle a miss and continued on), the scramble up Korrowal Knife’s Edge was moderately difficult we found. Once you get to the top the views are spectacular. The campground at Chinaman’s Gully has good cover from the wind and spectacular views into both valleys either side of Mt Solitary. There are a few new additions to the track that were not in the track notes. There are two separate facility spots between Miner’s campground and Ruined Castle; these facilities include a covered picnic table, a water tank and a toilet. The water tanks had water in them, however, there had been some decent rain a few weeks before (the downpour which had filled the Warragamba Dam to max capacity) and may not be always reliable. We will definitely be giving the full two day walk a go next year now that we are confident that the track is clear and the chance of getting lost is low.
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